Green Sleeves

Vacation, all I ever wanted.



Reblogged from yodiscrepo

breelandwalker:

sushinfood:

vvankinq:

this is fucked up. this fucked me up. the teachers fucked up by not showing us this fuck up. fuck.

dear god

i’m 28 and never knew this

WITCHCRAFT

(Source: yodiscrepo, via grownassmaam)

Reblogged from surrealvitriol

(Source: surrealvitriol, via shithoused)

Reblogged from wildcat2030
Reblogged from human
toocooltobehipster:

human:

jayjelenafan:

selbizzle:

human:

When you see it

The fuck…

See what?

Look closely


im so confused someone help please this is an emergency

toocooltobehipster:

human:

jayjelenafan:

selbizzle:

human:

When you see it

The fuck…

See what?

Look closely

im so confused someone help please this is an emergency

(via so-sally-was-a-street-walker)

Reblogged from sovietpostcards
sovietpostcards:

Drawing by K. Zotov, 1968 (by katya.)

sovietpostcards:

Drawing by K. Zotov, 1968 (by katya.)

Reblogged from popculturebrain
popculturebrain:

Ron Swanson found as a marble statue in Philadelphia | Warming Glow

popculturebrain:

Ron Swanson found as a marble statue in Philadelphia | Warming Glow

(via flavorpill)

Reblogged from popmech
Reblogged from gaywrites
gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  

And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 

Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.

I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”

I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.

Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.


(My Son Wears Dresses And That’s OK With Me | Seth Menachem for xoJane)

gaywrites:

We went to the party, and, as I figured, some of the guests laughed and made comments. One said to me, “Do you think this is funny? There are kids here. You want them to see this?” Another said, “You want him to be gay?”  
And I stayed calm. And I explained to them the best I could that there is no correlation between kids cross-dressing and being gay. And if he is gay, it’s not because of anything I did. It’s because he’s gay. And maybe it’s a stage. And maybe it’s not. But either way, I don’t want him to ever feel like he wasn’t able to express himself because his parents didn’t support him. And some understood. And some, trapped by religion or ignorance, gave us the stank face. 
Plenty of people are supportive. They’ll see my kids — Sydney with her long dirty blonde hair, and Asher with his short dark hair, and say, “I love your daughter’s pixie cut.” When I tell them he’s my son, they smile and say, “I love it.” They also apologize for confusing his gender, but I tell them, “Don’t apologize. He’s in a purple dress with sparkly shoes. How would you know?” I know there are parents who get worked up when you confuse their kids’ gender, but I’m not one of them.
I get home before my wife most nights, so I was taking the kids out to walk our dog. They were dressing up in different outfits, my daughter treating Asher like her doll, as she tried various dresses, shoes, and headbands on him. And then Sydney told me she wanted me to wear a dress, too — “Oh my god, it will be so funny.”
I said, “No,” but she kept begging. I said, “People will laugh at me.” She said, “If they do, I’ll tell them to go away.” And I couldn’t argue with that, as I squeezed myself into Carrie’s most flexible dress. We walked the dog on our block, and the pleasure my kids took in seeing their dad go out of his comfort zone trumped the humiliation I felt.
Carrie pulled up to the house, and I saw her slacked jaw from the end of the street. She laughed. She took a picture. And she told me I better not rip her dress. And then we all went for a pizza.

(via grownassmaam)

Reblogged from wildcat2030
wildcat2030:

Emotions used instead of cash at unique art auction
-
If someone places the winning bid on a work of art at an auction, it must mean that they liked the piece more than any of the other bidders … right? Well, actually, it could just mean that they were wealthier than any of the other bidders. Swedish design company Kosta Boda, however, recently held an event where money was irrelevant. In order to win a piece, bidders had to have the most pronounced physiological response upon first seeing it. The event was developed by the Ellermore advertising agency in collaboration with Kosta Boda, and included three works of glass art worth a total of over €25,000 (US$34,000). Those pieces were kept hidden until the auction began. Each bidder was hooked up to sensors that measured their heart rate and galvanic skin response (GSR) – the latter is the electrical conductivity of the skin, as determined by subtle sweat secretions that accompany strong emotions. They were also able to read the artists’ thoughts about their pieces in order to determine which one they wished to bid on, although they weren’t allowed to see the works in advance. (via Emotions used instead of cash at unique art auction)

wildcat2030:

Emotions used instead of cash at unique art auction
-
If someone places the winning bid on a work of art at an auction, it must mean that they liked the piece more than any of the other bidders … right? Well, actually, it could just mean that they were wealthier than any of the other bidders. Swedish design company Kosta Boda, however, recently held an event where money was irrelevant. In order to win a piece, bidders had to have the most pronounced physiological response upon first seeing it. The event was developed by the Ellermore advertising agency in collaboration with Kosta Boda, and included three works of glass art worth a total of over €25,000 (US$34,000). Those pieces were kept hidden until the auction began. Each bidder was hooked up to sensors that measured their heart rate and galvanic skin response (GSR) – the latter is the electrical conductivity of the skin, as determined by subtle sweat secretions that accompany strong emotions. They were also able to read the artists’ thoughts about their pieces in order to determine which one they wished to bid on, although they weren’t allowed to see the works in advance. (via Emotions used instead of cash at unique art auction)

Reblogged from laughhard
laughhard:

I’m sick of your shit nature.

laughhard:

I’m sick of your shit nature.